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Women's Center of Greater Danbury

Domestic Violence Hotline: (203) 731-5206
Sexual Assault Hotline: (203) 731-5204

Parent & Community Adult Programs

Our Parent and Community Adult training programs give attendees:

  1. the knowledge and tools to recognize perpetrators of abuse and then hold them accountable,
  2. work for systems change that will reinforce consequences for perpetrators and provide support for victims, and
  3. change those elements in our culture that support the dynamics of violence.

We aim to prepare parents and caregivers to:

  • reinforce safety concepts taught in the classroom
  • provide your child with environments and skills that build protective and resiliency factors
  • handle possible disclosures sensitively and safety plan appropriately

In our school surveys, approximately 70 – 85% of students say they would talk to someone if they had a problem relating to dating violence or sexual assault or harassment:

  • 80% would talk to a friend
  • 65% would talk to a parent
  • 21-32% would talk to a crisis hotline, and
  • 13-28% would talk to a teacher (percentages vary slightly depending on issue.)

Would you be ready if your child turned to you?

The real power to end abuse in our society lies in the hands of adults. Intellectually, emotionally and experientially, children’s ability to stop adult abusive behavior is, in the majority of scenarios, very limited – if not nonexistent.

Click to View Our Programs:

Stranger Danger and Other Urban Myths

Stranger Danger and Other Urban Myths

Stranger Danger and Other Urban Myths: In this workshop, participants learn: the real dangers/risk of child sexual assault (CSA), the limits of the sex offender registry, forms of CSA and how it happens (including perpetrator profiles and tactics), risk reduction for children, how to build protective and resiliency factors in their child, the role of the adult in preventing CSA, and how to recognize if your child has been victimized and what to do.

Raising Healthy Children in a Violence Prone Society

Raising Healthy Children in a Violence Prone Society

Raising Healthy Children in a Violence Prone Society: Our society’s level of cultural violence and individual risk for being a victim or perpetrator of violence are directly linked to stereotypical definitions of gender and systems of oppression. This workshop explores those stereotypes and systems, how they are reinforced by media, family, school and community, and what can be done to counter these messages and effect social change, including: Teaching critical thinking skills Parenting skills for raising a resilient child Creating a strength-based school environment

Bullying and Relational Aggression

Bullying and Relational Aggression

Bullying and Relational Aggression: Helping the Bully, Target, and Bystander: Participants learn about: the difference between bullying, mean behavior and conflict; the impact of bullying, including relational aggression such as rumors, cliques and backstabbing, on the target, school, the child practicing bullying behavior, and bystander; how to bully-proof schools; ways to help and empower targets of bullying and bystanders; and how to help children who bully.

Internet/Electronic Media Safety

Internet/Electronic Media Safety

Internet/Electronic Media Safety: Explores all topics listed under student version from a parent perspective. While reference is made to parental controls (filters, spyware, etc.), emphasis is placed on reinforcing and building skills and strengths in the child to self-monitor, think critically, and resist outside pressures that can lead to risky behaviors on electronic media (computers, cell phones, Wii/Play Station games with online link capacity, etc.) In addition, this workshop will: Provide a basic understanding of real cyber/electronic media risks of child sexual assault, stalking, and harassment or bullying Explore how the technology enhances predator’s strategies Identify indicators that the minor may be experiencing dangers, including moving from online to in-person contact Provide participant with techniques for age-appropriate risk reduction plans No prior computer/electronic media knowledge is necessary for this workshop. Our very elementary technology introduction provides the participant with sufficient understanding of risks and opportunities for risk reduction.

What Parents Need to Know About Dating Violence and Date Rape

What Parents Need to Know About Dating Violence and Date Rape

What Parents Need to Know About Dating Violence / What Parents Need to Know About Date Rape: These workshops explore: -the dynamics of the abuse, -its impact on the victim, -how to recognize and help an actual or potential victim or perpetrator, -how to do basic risk assessment and safety planning, -how to access community resources (legal, medical, counseling), -how to reinforce protective and resiliency factors in your child to minimize the potential for victimization by or perpetration of abuse in the first place, and -self-care for the parent (the “secondary victim.”)

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do (And Sometimes Risky): Whether teens are ending a relationship with mutual consent or because one partner is experiencing abuse, breaking up can be emotionally traumatic. Research shows that 60% of teen relationships involve some form abuse; 25% is physical or sexual. It is especially critical that a teen leaving an unhealthy relationship be able to sustain that decision and leave safely. Often, abuse escalates when the victim attempts to break free. This workshop will help parents to: identify abusive dating relationships assess level of risks for escalation of abuse or danger understand why someone may be unwilling to break up help the teen safety plan around risks, and support a healthy grieving process

Campus Safety

Campus Safety

Campus Safety: Designed as a student/parent presentation, this curriculum can also be presented to parents only who are exploring colleges with their children or sending a child off to college. This workshop explores how to assess campus risks for and safety measures around sexual assault – including hazing, stalking, sexual harassment, date rape drugs and alcohol; student rights on campus and under the Cleary Act; limits of self-defense; proactive risk-reduction by the victim; prevention by the potential perpetrator; and supporting your child who becomes a victim of / is perpetrating sexual assault or dating violence.

Children Who Witness Domestic Violence

Children Who Witness Domestic Violence

Children Who Witness Domestic Violence: Countering the Effects of the Abusive Parent: this specialized workshop explores the impact of witnessing domestic violence (defined as physical, sexual, verbal, emotional and economic abuse) on a child’s social, emotional and academic development. When presented to the adult victim of domestic abuse, this workshop focuses on how the protective parent can counter these effects, promote healing in the child, and hold the abuser accountable for his or her behaviors. When presented to abusers, the workshop focuses on the abuse tactics, their negative impact on the victim and child, legal consequences, and healthy alternatives and options to change. This workshop can also be presented to teachers and other adults who work with children; in this case, focus is on creating a trauma-sensitive environment that will provide the safety the child witness needs for optimal functioning.

Domestic Violence 101

Domestic Violence 101

Domestic Violence 101: Whether you are the victim of domestic violence or know someone who is, this workshop will enhance your knowledge of its dynamics and safety planning options.

Location & Contact

Women's Center of Greater Danbury 
2 West Street
Danbury, Connecticut 06810
E-mail: womenscenter@wcogd.org

Counseling/Administrative Headquarters:
Ph: (203) 731-5200
Fax: (203) 731-5207

Local Hotlines:
Domestic Violence Hotline: (203) 731-5206
Sexual Assault Hotline: (203) 731-5204

National Domestic Violence Hotline:
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
1-800-787-3224 (TTY)

 

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